Archive for the ‘Legal’ Category

Mar
06
    
CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SURVEILLANCE OF THE CLAMSHELL by Robin Read

CORPORATE AND GOVERNMENT SURVEILLANCE OF THE CLAMSHELL

 CIVIL LIBERTIES VIOLATED

 YELLOW JOURNALISM, 1970s STYLE

by Robin Read

Corporate and government surveillance of the Clamshell Alliance began with the inception of the organization in 1976, intensified in the weeks before the April 1977 occupation, and continued for the next several years. Fear mongering by right wing organizations and media, fed by the surveillance and infiltration, were among the factors that led Seabrook area residents to urge the Clamshell to call off its planned massive 1978 occupation and instead hold a three day legal rally on the plant site. The surveillance and infiltration contributed to internal divisions before and after the 1978 demonstration. Read the rest of this entry »

Mar
06
    
SEABROOK RESIDENTS’ STORIES: Carlene Peruse, Diane Garand, Tony and Louisa Santasucci from Robbie Leppzer’s film

Carlene Peruse, Diane Garand, Tony and Louisa Santasucci

Robbie Leppzer, in his film Seabrook 77, interviewed Seabrook residents; following are excerpts.

 Carlene Peruse:

I have lived in Seabrook all of my life and I am all against the nuclear plant. I don’t want it; we don’t need it and we’re in hopes of stopping it.

My first thought, of course, is the radiation. I have children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. It won’t affect me so much, at my age, I’m 62, but the younger ones growing up, I’m afraid it definitely will. We took up a petition and had it put on the ballot. “Should there be a nuclear power plant in Seabrook?” The vote came out 768 “no” and 632 “yes. The selectman called it non-binding. Read the rest of this entry »

Mar
06
    
BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATERS By Peter Kellman

BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATERS

By Peter Kellman

It got to the point where the Clamshell had the political power to force the state of New Hampshire to force Public Service to allow the Clamshell to use three acres on the nuclear plant construction site for a two-day demonstration. Diane Garand walked down and got a building permit from the town of Seabrook for a stage, a windmill, a dome and a bridge. She wanted it done legally.

Part of the Clam’s deal with the state was that we could get on the property early for the construction and set up, but we couldn’t come through the main gate where the demonstrators would march in. The Seabrook town dump abutted Public Service property with a drainage ditch in between. Diane got permission for our set-up crews to go in through the dump. So we pre-fabbed a bridge, the Bridge Over Troubled Waters, that went from the dump to the demonstration site for the set-up crews to cross over onto the site.

After the demonstration, we had a ceremony at the Bridge over Troubled Waters and we donated the bridge to the town of Seabrook. The selectman who received it made a speech in which Seabrook accepted the bridge. He said that it was the first time in his memory that anything had been donated to the town of Seabrook.

Mar
06
    
How the Clamshell Got Its Name by Renny Cushing

How the Clamshell Alliance Got Its Name

By Renny Cushing

 The Clamshell Alliance got its name from the testimony of a SAPL witness, who testified that one of the effects of the cooling system, a total mortality system taking in more than a billion gallons of water a day, could destroy the “neuritic band” of pelagic clam larvae. By the way, the Clams can and do rightly claim a huge impact on the, I hope, permanent demise of nuclear power in this country. They cannot, however, claim one thing that SAPL achieved: the actual cessation of construction of the project – all
over the issue of the environmental impact of the cooling system.

Feb
17
    
CLAM SELF-DEFENSE AND LAWYERS by Benjie Hiller

CLAM SELF-DEFENSE AND LAWYERS

By Benjie Hiller

 

            For me, working with Clamshell, first as a law student and then as a lawyer, was a remarkable experience. I was involved in the planning of actions and with legal training for demonstrators and legal workers. I met with and advised folks who had been arrested, both during and after their arrests. I assisted folks in preparing for court hearings, helped them draft pleadings, and sat with them as an advisor at trial. Thirty years later, nothing has even come close to how Read the rest of this entry »