Archive for February, 2010

Feb
17
    
CLAM SELF-DEFENSE AND LAWYERS by Benjie Hiller

CLAM SELF-DEFENSE AND LAWYERS

By Benjie Hiller

 

            For me, working with Clamshell, first as a law student and then as a lawyer, was a remarkable experience. I was involved in the planning of actions and with legal training for demonstrators and legal workers. I met with and advised folks who had been arrested, both during and after their arrests. I assisted folks in preparing for court hearings, helped them draft pleadings, and sat with them as an advisor at trial. Thirty years later, nothing has even come close to how Read the rest of this entry »

Feb
17
    
INSIDE: Manchester Days by Karl Meyer

INSIDE: Manchester Days

Karl Meyer

All did not come together easily.  No food had been stockpiled for prisoners.  Upon arrival Francis Crowe looked around and said to a friend, “Let’s put up a table and share all the food we have in our packs.” The National Guard guards were grand kids compared to the 58 year-old peace activist.   And most were scarcely older than the rest of their charges.  When the guards insisted the men’s and women’s cots be separated, Read the rest of this entry »

Feb
16
    
In Memoriam: Elizabeth Boardman

In Memoriam: Elizabeth Boardman

Peacework July/August 1996

Elizabeth Boardman, a Quaker activist who co-founded the New England Voice of Women in 1961 and the Clamshell Alliance in 1974, died on May 24 in Medford, NJ. Read the rest of this entry »

Feb
16
    
How Ya Gonna Keep ’em Down on the Farm? by Kristie Conrad

How Ya Gonna Keep em Down on the Farm?

By Kristie Conrad

I grew up smack in south central NH, in dairy country, where we would often awaken to find cows had once again broken through the fence and generously left behind evidence of their presence all over our front lawn. I grew up sheltered from the harshness of much of life, though I do remember that day when Ward McAllister’s brother returned home in a pine box from Vietnam. It was an awakening that ended some of my innocence Read the rest of this entry »

Feb
08
    
A Desperate Passion by Helen Caldicott

A Desperate Passion

By Helen Caldicott

 t was on a cold spring day in May 1977 when the wind cuts straight through your clothes, the daffodils were not even out and the ground was still brown and muddy.

I had moved to live in Boston from Australia six months earlier and was only just acclimatizing to the New England weather.

We, my daughter Penny and I, marched in a ragged bunch down the main street of Seabrook New Hampshire to the municipal rubbish dump where a nuclear reactor was to be sited. I had been asked to address the crowd Read the rest of this entry »